Don’t Let The Parents See! California Ethnic Studies Advisor Tells Teachers To Be Careful About What Parents Can See

MIKI Yoshihito via (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/) Flickr

A presenter, Jorge Pacheco, at a California ethnic studies training session told teachers that they need to be “extra careful” about what teaching materials the parents see.

In Santa Clara County, California a training session was held for teachers about the new ethnic studies curriculum.

The presentation began with a “land acknowledgment”, this is a statement about the land a course is taught on. In the case of Santa Clara this “land acknowledgment” claims that the school occupies the territory of the Muwekma Ohlone Nation.

The presentation would continue with an examination of the “roots of settle colonialism.” Pacheco blamed colonialism and its many sins on oppressive white males who utilized genocide, God, patriarchy, white supremacy, and the idea of private property to create the United States.

Pacheco would go to say that the guidelines from the district and Parents who may look at their children’s classroom materials are “barriers” to ethnic studies.

From the Daily Wire: 

“[We] have to be extra careful about what is being said, since we can’t just say something controversial now that we’re in people’s homes. Parents can take out of context or see what materials are being used so need to be careful of what they see,” Pacheco wrote.

According to the presentation materials, Pacheco pushed ethnic studies seemingly to indoctrinate children and lead them to activism.

“The kids become a subject and you are intending to awaken them to the oppression that they aren’t aware of but that they are actively participating in,” Pacheco wrote. “Then how to lead to social change.”

Teachers were also encouraged to read “Pedagogy of the Oppressed” by Paulo Freire, which argues that oppressed people can only regain humanity by fighting for liberation with other oppressed people. The book was initially written for oppressed people living in Brazil in 1968, though American education institutions have reconstructed the lessons to fit the current racial climate.

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